Undergraduate Courses

ITAL110a, Elementary Italian I

A beginning course with extensive practice in speaking, reading, writing, and listening and a thorough introduction to Italian grammar. Activities include group and pairs work, role-playing, and conversation. Introduction to Italian culture through readings and films.

Conducted in Italian. Credit only on completion of ITAL 120.

Enrollment is managed through Preference Selection.

Professor: Anna Iacovella
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Multiple Offerings

ITAL125a, Intensive Elementary Italian

An accelerated beginning course in Italian that covers in one term the material taught in ITAL 110 and 120. Admits to ITAL 130 or 145. Enrollment limited to 15.

Professor: Michael Farina
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: M-F 9.25-11.15am

ITAL130a, Intermediate Italian I

The first half of a two-term sequence designed to increase students’ proficiency in the four language skills and advanced grammar concepts. Authentic readings paired with contemporary films. In-class group and pairs activities, role-playing, and conversation. Admits to ITAL 140.

Conducted in Italian. Prerequisite: ITAL 120 or equivalent.

Enrollment managed through Preference Selection.

Professor: Siobhan Quinlan
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: Multiple Offerings

ITAL145b, Intensive Intermediate Italian

An accelerated intermediate course in Italian that covers in one term the material taught in ITAL 130 and 140. Continued practice in the four basic skills begun at the elementary level. Emphasis on grammar review, vocabulary enrichment, and appreciation of literary texts. Admits to Group B courses.

Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: ITAL 120 or 125.

Professor: Anna Iacovella
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: M-F 9.25-11.15am

ITAL150a, Advanced Composition and Conversation

Discussion of social, political, and literary issues in order to improve active command of the language. Development of advanced reading skills through magazine and newspaper articles, essays, short stories, films, and a novel; enhancement of writing skills through experiments with reviews, essays, creative writing, and business and informal Italian. Classroom emphasis on advanced speaking skills and vocabulary building.

Professor: Patrick Waldron
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: WF 11.35-12.50

ITAL159a, History and Culture of Naples

Historical phenomena and literary and cultural movements that have shaped the city of Naples, Italy, from antiquity to the present. The linguistic richness and diversity that characterizes Naples; political, social, and cultural change; differences between standard Italian and the Neapolitan dialect in literature, film, and everyday life. A bridge course between L4 and other L5 courses.

Prerequisite: ITAL 140 or equivalent.

Professor: Anna Iacovella
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: WF 1.00-2.15

ITAL303a, Italian Film: Postwar to Postmodern

A study of important Italian films from World War II to the present. Consideration of works that typify major directors and trends. Topics include neorealism, self-reflexivity and metacinema, fascism and war, and postmodernism. Films by Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, De Sica, Visconti, Pasolini, Bertolucci, Wertmuller, Tornatore, and Moretti.

Most films in Italian with English subtitles.

Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: TTH 4:00 p.m. - 5.15 p.m.

ITAL310a, Dante in Translation

A critical reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy and selections from the minor works, with an attempt to place Dante’s work in the intellectual and social context of the late Middle Ages by relating literature to philosophical, theological, and political concerns.

One discussion section conducted in Italian.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: TTH 1.00-2.15

ITAL315a, Catholic Intellectual Tradition

Introductory survey of the interaction between Catholicism and Western culture from the first century to the present, with a focus on pivotal moments and crucial developments that defined both traditions. Key beliefs, rites, and customs of the Roman Catholic Church, and the ways in which they have found expression; interaction between Catholics and the institution of the Church; Catholicism in its cultural and sociopolitical matrices. Close reading of primary sources.

Professor: Carlos Eire

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: T TH 2.30-3.20

ITAL470a, Special Studies in Italian Literature

A series of tutorials to direct students in special interests and requirements. Students meet regularly with a faculty member.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2016
Day/Time: 1 HTBA