Graduate Courses (Fall 2021 & Spring 2022)

Ital 570 Methods and Techniques in the Italian-Language Classroom

This course creates a substantial apprenticeship program for second-year graduate students in Italian. Rising teaching fellows are exposed to a variety of methodologies and perspectives historically and currently applied in teaching Italian as a foreign language with reference to global education. In order to maximize all learning opportunities, students analyze and discuss several methods without dismissing or favoring some over others. The intent is to encourage students to develop their own teaching styles, drawn from a number of important approaches to language pedagogy. At the same time, far from focusing only on methodologies and practices, the course strives to integrate other aspects of language education as well, and students have the chance both to observe classes and to develop and teach several classes of their own during the term.

Professor: Anna Iacovella
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Monday, 11.30 a.m.

Ital 577 Women in the Middle Ages

Medieval understandings of womanhood examined through analysis of writings by and/or about women, from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Introduction to the premodern Western canon and assessment of the role that women played in its construction.

ITAL 577, Fridays, 11.30 a.m. is open to seniors, who are taking the course toward the certificate or the Italian Studies Major. 

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2021
Day/Time: Friday, 11.30 a.m.

ITAL 668 Translating the Renaissance

Would there have been a Renaissance without translation? We approach this question by beginning with the first modern treatise on translation, by the Florentine chancellor Leonardo Bruni, and moving on to consider the role of translation in Florence’s and Tuscany’s growing cultural and political mastery over the peninsula—and in Italy’s cultural domination of Europe. We go on to explore the translation of “medieval” into “early modern” Europe, the translation of visual into verbal material, and the role of gender in the practice of translation. Students engage in their own translation projects as we dedicate the last part of the seminar to the diffusion of the Petrarchan sonnet tradition in early modern Europe.

Professor: Jane Tylus
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Thursday 1.30p.m.-3.20p.m.

ITAL 691

Individual Study

Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: 1 HTBA

ITAL 720 Renaissance Epic

This course looks at Renaissance epic poetry in relationship to classical models and as a continuing generic tradition. It examines epic type scenes, formal strategies, and poetic architecture. It looks at themes of exile and imperial foundations, aristocratic ideology, and the role of gender. The main readings are drawn from Vergil’s Aeneid, Lucan’s Bellum civile, Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata, Camões’s Os Lusíadas, and Spenser’s Faerie Queene.

1 credit for Yale College students
Professor: David Quint
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Tuesday 1.30p.m.-3.20p.m.

ITAL 780 Il romanzo del Novecento

No literary form is better suited to gauging the convulsive changes wrought by Italy’s entrance into modernity than the novel. Infinitely permeable to the forces of historical circumstance, the novel counters these external forces with its own version of the evolving Italian subject in all its personal richness and complexity. We study the evolution of this literary genre throughout the course of the twentieth century and, in the process, adopt a variety of approaches, including, but not limited to, semiotics, psychoanalysis, narratology, gender, ideological criticism, and “la questione della lingua.”

In Italian.

1 credit for Yale College students
Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3.30p.m. - 5.20p.m.

ITAL 781 The Decameron

An in-depth study of Boccaccio’s text as a journey in genre in which the writer surveys all the storytelling possibilities available to him in the current repertory of short narrative fiction—ranging from ennobling example to flamboyant fabliaux, including hagiography, aphorisms, romances, anecdotes, tragedies, and practical jokes—and self-consciously manipulates those forms to create a new literary space of astonishing variety, vitality, and subversive power. In the relationship between the elaborate frame-story and the embedded tales, theoretical issues of considerable contemporary interest emerge—questions of gendered discourse, narratology, structural pastiche, and reader response among them. The Decameron is read in Italian or in English. Close attention is paid to linguistic usage and rhetorical techniques in this foundational text of the vernacular prose tradition.
1 credit for Yale College students
Professor: Millicent Marcus
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3.30p.m. - 5.20p.m.

ITAL 999 Preparing for Doctoral Exams

The aim of this seminar is to give third-year students the opportunity to work together on the three projects that will occupy them throughout Year 3: the oral comprehensive exam (for early November), the written exam on the three topics lists (for March–April), and the writing of the prospectus, to be defended in September of Year 4. Weekly meetings are run and coordinated by a faculty member in Italian, generally the graduate adviser. Each week of the first nine weeks is devoted to a specific topic on the comprehensive lists requested by the students themselves. Students are in conversation with each other, with the presiding faculty member, and with an additional guest lecturer who is an expert in the areas under discussion. Following the ninth week, there is a dry run of the oral exam. The remaining four weeks are devoted to discussing the composition of the topics lists and to the writing of the prospectus. Informal meetings may continue through the spring to discuss these issues as well.

Prerequisite: completion of all other graduate course work (15 credits).

1 credit for Yale College students
Professor: Jane Tylus
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: 1 HTBA