Serena Bassi

Serena Bassi's picture
Assistant Professor
Address: 
320 York, Rm 527, New Haven, CT 06520-8311
(510) 993-5013

Serena Bassi is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Italian Studies. She obtained her PhD in Italian Studies from the University of Warwick (2014). She was research fellow at the Warwick Institute for Advanced Studies (2013- 2014) and Leverhulme Early Career Fellow at Cardiff University (2014- 2017). 

Her first book, Mistranslating Minority: Queer World-Making in Italy after 1968, traces the travel from the United States into Italy of theories of “sexual identity politics” at the end of the social movement era. The book argues that theories carving space for sexual minorities within sanctioned national narratives were translated and reformulated as to fit a public discourse traversed by post-fascist, catholic and communist ideologies, and their competing visions of modernity. 

She is also currently at work on The Handbook of Translation and Sexuality co-edited with Prof. Brian Baer (Kent State University). Her writing has appeared in Translation Studies, Comparative Literature Studies, Gender/Sexuality/Italy and Modern Languages Open

Courses

ITAL 948 Theorizing the Modern Subject

This class introduces graduate students in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to Italian critical theory from the 15th century to the present by focusing on different ways of thinking about the emergence of the modern subject, subjectivity and subjection. We read political thinkers and cultural critics like Machiavelli, Vico, Leopardi, Gramsci, Negri, Federici, Lazzarato, Agamben, Braidotti, and Eco. The theorists we read ask us to think about the multiple ways in which one becomes a modern subject by being hailed by particular ideas of what it means to be human, as well as by the State and by capitalism. Our journey into Italian thought is structured through four units: 1) Beyond the Modern Subject: Theorizing the Post-Human; 2) Subjectivity: Theorizing the Modern State; 3) Subjection: Theorizing Modern Economies; 4) The Modern Subject Before Modernity: Italian Renaissance Thought and the Human. During the course, students also draft, redraft, write, and edit a publishable article-length original piece of research working with one or more sources they have read in the class.

This class introduces graduate students in the Humanities and the Social Sciences to Italian critical theory from the 15th century to the present by focusing on different ways of thinking about the emergence of the modern subject, subjectivity and subjection. We read political thinkers and cultural critics like Machiavelli, Vico, Leopardi, Gramsci, Negri, Federici, Lazzarato, Agamben, Braidotti, and Eco. The theorists we read ask us to think about the multiple ways in which one becomes a modern subject by being hailed by particular ideas of what it means to be human, as well as by the State and by capitalism. Our journey into Italian thought is structured through four units: 1) Beyond the Modern Subject: Theorizing the Post-Human; 2) Subjectivity: Theorizing the Modern State; 3) Subjection: Theorizing Modern Economies; 4) The Modern Subject Before Modernity: Italian Renaissance Thought and the Human. During the course, students also draft, redraft, write, and edit a publishable article-length original piece of research working with one or more sources they have read in the class.

Term: Fall 2022
Day/Time: Tuesday 9:30 am - 11.20 am