Giuseppe Mazzotta

Giuseppe Mazzotta's picture
Sterling Professor in the Humanities for Italian
Address: 
82-90 Wall St, Room 404, New Haven, CT 06511-6605
(203) 432-0598

Giuseppe Mazzotta is the Sterling Professor of Humanities for Italian. He has written a number of essays about every century of Italian literary history.

He served as president of the Dante Society of America (2003-2009).

His books include: Dante, Poet of the Desert: History and Allegory in the Divine Comedy (Princeton, 1979); The World at Play in Boccaccio’s Decameron (Princeton, 1986); Dante’s Vision and the Circle of Knowledge (Princeton, 1993); The Worlds of Petrarch (Duke UP, 193); The New Map of the World: the Poetic Philosophy of Giambattista Vico (Princeton, 1998) (Italian translation, Turin: Einaudi, 2001); Cosmopoiesis: The Renaissance Experiment (Toronto UP, 2001) (Italian translation, Palermo: Sellerio 2008). He has also edited or co-edited several boooks, such as Critical Essays on Dante (Hall, 1991) and Master Regis (Fordham UP, 1985). In 2008, he published the Norton edition of Dante’s Inferno (translated by M. Palma).

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Courses

ITAL 226, Poets of the Duecento

The course explores and traces the multiple ways in which the experiments and lyrical achievements of the Duecento (thirteenth century) shaped and made possible the remarkable achievements of the Italian Trecento. The core of the course consists in the reading of the Sicilian School of poetry, some Provencal troubadours and above all, of the remarkable achievements of gifted poets, such as Francis of Assisi, Cavalcanti, Sordello etc.

Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11.35a.m. - 12.50p.m.

ITAL 238 War, Literature, and Politics in the Italian Renaissance

The course explores and traces the multiple ways in which the experiments and lyrical achievements of the Duecento (thirteenth century) shaped and made possible the remarkable achievements of the Italian Trecento. The core of the course consists in the reading of the Sicilian School of poetry, some Provencal troubadours and above all, of the remarkable achievements of gifted poets, such as Francis of Assisi, Cavalcanti, Sordello etc.

Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11.35a.m. - 12.50p.m.

ITAL 576, War, Literature, and Politics in the Italian Renaissance

The Renaissance was a time of significant political and social unrest. These disorders are reflected in the writings of the period’s major authors, who often coded these struggles in gendered terms. The objectives of this course are to familiarize ourselves with these works, and in particular with the lively debate that questioned women’s ability to fight in wars, especially in the Italian sixteenth century; to sharpen our skills as readers of works that feature heroic female warriors and so-called “effeminate” male knights; and to explore and perhaps demystify the universal gendering of war. The course considers Classical and Renaissance philosophical literature, epic poems penned by men and women, and Shakespeare’s Coriolanus, as well as short biographies of women in combat. Authors include, Plato, Aristotle, Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Shakespeare, Fonte and Marinella.  All texts are available in English translation.

Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Mondays, 3.30-5.20

ITAL 700, The New Map of the World: Vico's Poetic History and Philosophy

This course examines Vico’s thought globally and in the historical context of the late Renaissance and the Baroque. Starting with Vico’s Autobiography, working to his University Inaugural Orations, On the Study of Methods of Our Time, the seminar delves into his juridical-political texts and submits the second New Science (1744) to a detailed analysis. Some attention is given to Vico’s poetic production and the encomia he wrote. The overarching idea of the seminar is the definition of Vico’s new discourse for the modern age. To this end, discussion deals prominently with issues such as Baroque encyclopedic representations, the heroic imagination, the senses of “discovery,” the redefinition of “science,” the reversal of neo-Aristotelian and neo-Platonic poetics, the crisis of the Renaissance, and the role of the myth.
 
Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesdays 2.30-4.20

ITAL 707, Poets of the Duecento

The course explores and traces the multiple ways in which the experiments and lyrical achievements of the Duecento (thirteenth century) shaped and made possible the remarkable achievements of the Italian Trecento. The core consists of reading the Sicilian School of poetry, some Provençal troubadours, and, above all, the work of such gifted poets as Francis of Assisi, Cavalcanti, Sordello, and others. It ends with a critical reading of Dante’s Vita Nuova.

Term: Spring 2020
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11.35a.m. - 12.50p.m.